Asked and answered: What readers want to know about the election

            The 2020 election will be like no other, as the novel coronavirus continues to affect everything from the structure of debates and campaign events to how Americans can vote. The rules around mail-in and absentee ballots as well as President Trump’s frequent assertions that the outcome of the election could be unknown for months have confused many people.

            So far, The Washington Post has collected and organized 173 questions from readers about this challenging election season. Many of the questions fall into common themes, and this guide provides links to reporting that holds the answers to those frequently referenced topic areas. We are updating the guide twice a day, and the topics are reordered below with the most frequently asked election questions.

            You can keep asking us questions?here.

            The Post has collected 56 new questions in the last 14 days. Categories are organized by frequency of most recent questions. Change in interest is based on questions asked in the last 4 weeks.

            5% unchanged interest over last 4 weeks Mail-in and absentee voting

            -22% less interest over last 4 weeks Ballot drop-off

            +150% more interest over last 4 weeks Early voting

            Resources

            The coronavirus has affected the way many Americans plan to vote, with many states expanding access to mail-in voting. As of Sept. 25, more than 198 million Americans are eligible to cast a ballot by mail. Here’s what you need to know:

            How to prevent your mail ballot from being rejected

            Map: Which states can cast ballots by mail

            Video: Understanding absentee voting, mail-in voting and early voting

            100% more interest over last 4 weeks Barriers to voting

            -75% less interest over last 4 weeks In-person voting

            -67% less interest over last 4 weeks State and local races

            Resources

            The coronavirus has affected the way many Americans plan to vote, with many states expanding access to mail-in voting. As of Sept. 25, more than 198 million Americans are eligible to cast a ballot by mail. Here’s what you need to know:

            How to prevent your mail ballot from being rejected

            Map: Which states can cast ballots by mail

            Video: Understanding absentee voting, mail-in voting and early voting

            100% more interest over last 4 weeks The policies and issues

            0% unchanged interest over last 4 weeks Registering to vote

            100% more interest over last 4 weeks Determining who wins

            Resources

            The coronavirus has affected the way many Americans plan to vote, with many states expanding access to mail-in voting. As of Sept. 25, more than 198 million Americans are eligible to cast a ballot by mail. Here’s what you need to know:

            How to prevent your mail ballot from being rejected

            Map: Which states can cast ballots by mail

            Video: Understanding absentee voting, mail-in voting and early voting

            100% more interest over last 4 weeks Volunteering

            0% unchanged interest over last 4 weeks Election integrity

            Resources

            The coronavirus has affected the way many Americans plan to vote, with many states expanding access to mail-in voting. As of Sept. 25, more than 198 million Americans are eligible to cast a ballot by mail. Here’s what you need to know:

            How to prevent your mail ballot from being rejected

            Map: Which states can cast ballots by mail

            Video: Understanding absentee voting, mail-in voting and early voting

            Methodology

            Wondering how this works? Here's an explanation:

            Tell The Post what you want to know about the 2020 election.

            Reporters are interested in any questions about the election, but it’s helpful to ask a question that addresses a common concern or issue with the election or campaigns. You can also ask about how something works, such as mail-in ballots or the electoral college. If you’re comfortable doing so, please explain why you’re asking the question and how the answer may impact your life.

            A Post journalist will read your question.

            We’re reading every query and categorizing questions into topic areas, such as “ballot drop-off,” “poll workers” or “swing states.” The categories help us understand what topics people may have the most questions about and how that’s changed over time. A reporter may also email or call you to get more context regarding your submission.

            We’ll send questions to different parts of the newsroom.

            When we notice trends or find a question worth answering on its own, we’ll send those submissions to the appropriate team in the newsroom.

            A reader’s question may inform reporting efforts that are already underway. In some cases, a question will become the basis for an entire article. If we answer your question directly, we’ll email you.

            About

            Written by Tom Johnson. Curated by Teddy Amenabar, Eliza Goren, Tom Johnson, Steven Johnson and Nia Decaille. Edited by Everdeen Mason. Design and development by Jake Crump.

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